Events 2019

events women

The magical seven seconds

From 1985 to 2006, the 60 metres was a fixed part of the programme at INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe. During this time, almost everyone gave their long legs the credit for their fast race times, be it Merlene Ottey or Irina Privalova, who both became the first women in the world to run the race in under seven seconds in Madrid on the 14 February 1992. Both were also winners at the INDOOR MEETING. Ottey won in 1995 and Privalova, who had meanwhile improved the still valid world record to 6.92 seconds, claimed victory in 1996. The 7.04 seconds she ran back then are still the Meeting record.
From 2010 on, a German athlete, Verena Sailer, also joined the mix. The 100-metre European champion in Barcelona in 2010 has always been at the front of the race and was only defeated by Bulgarian Ivet Lalova through a photo finish at the Meeting in 2013. Both finished the race within the same time of 7.19 seconds. In 2014, she was then able to win at the INDOOR MEETING for the first time. Verena Sailer is no longer competing, having retired in 2015. It took as many as three INDOOR MEETINGs for a German female athlete to triumph again last year. Following Great Britain’s Dina Asher Smith (7.12 seconds in 2015), the Netherlands’ Dafne Schippers (7.08 seconds in 2016), and Jamaica’s Gayan Evans (7.14 seconds in 2017), this year’s winner was Tatjana Pinto, with 7.10 seconds,  the starting shot for a great year. In addition to her victory at the INDOOR MEETING, she also secured the title of German Indoor Champion in the 60 and 200-metre races and the bronze medal in the 4 x 100-metre relay race at the European Championships in Berlin.

Almost new, but already Cult

It is the longest distance at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe: the women’s 3000-metre race. This competition has only been on the agenda at the Meeting since 2010 but has been met with great enthusiasm by the athletics-mad spectators in Karlsruhe who have been particularly attached to the long distance since its premier. That surely has a lot to do with Haile Gebrselassie’s unforgettable runs for the men, but what the women have offered spectators since their first appearance in 2010 is not at all lacking. Since then, the 3,000-metres race at the INDOOR MEETING Karlsruhe has been among the most exciting events on the agenda. The last time the women ran the 3,000-metres was in 2017. The finish line was crossed at 8:26,41 minutes - a record for both the Meeting and for Europe. This spectacular time was run by the reigning European Champion for the 1,500-metre, Laura Muir.

Comeback after 13 years

In terms of technique, the triple jump probably belongs to the most difficult disciplines in athletics, because mastering the “hop”, “step”, and “jump” is anything but easy. But if they succeed, the best female athletes fly through the air for more than 15 meters. INDOOR MEETING fans have had to wait 13 years for the return of the women’s triple jump. This year, the time has finally come. However, this discipline will not be entirely unfamiliar to the audience in Karlsruhe. After all, they were lucky enough to experience the men’s triple jump as part of the IAAF World Indoor Tour in the trade fair hall in 2016. At the start of the millennium (2000 to 2006), the women’s triple jump formed an integral part of the INDOOR MEETING’s repertoire. Tatyana Lebedeva from Russia was the discipline’s first winner, and she has managed to hold onto the indoor world record (15.36 meters) she set in Budapest since 2004. At the last edition – back then still in the Europahalle – Carlota Castrejana from Spain won the gold with 13.76 meters.

From Nicole Rieger to Silke Spiegelburg

When the women’s pole vault was first part of the INDOOR MEETING agenda in 1992, the discipline was still in its infancy and the technique the women applied to jump the bar at the time was far from mature. But its inclusion in the INDOOR MEETING agenda gave the discipline a huge boost, and so the Karlsruhe Meeting became one of the pioneers of women’s pole vaulting. 3.80 metres were enough for the then winner Nicole Rieger for ASV Landau to win. Seven years later, Nicole Humbert, as she was called after marrying, vaulted a new world record of 4.56 metres in Stockholm, illustrating the rapid development of the discipline among women. In the early years, it was Nicole Humbert or the Chinese Sun Cayun and Cai Weiyan who shaped pole vaulting at the Meeting. Later, it was Svetlana Feofanowa of Russia, winner of multiple medals at World and European Championships as well as the Olympic Games, or Anna Rogowska of Poland. She has also won multiple World Cup, European Championship, and Olympic medals. The last two editions in 2011 and 2012 were won by Silke Spiegelburg from Leverkusen. In 2011, the 30-year-old set the current Meeting record with a 4.71-metre jump. In addition to this achievement, Spiegelburg holds the German record of 4.82 metres.

Starting number 768

When Sports Director Alain Blondel distributed starting numbers to the athletes at the INDOOR MEETING on February 10, 2008, he handed Susanna Kallur the number 768 – a symbolic number. 7.68 (seconds) – this number would beat the world record held by Kallur’s fellow countrywoman Ludmila Engquist for 18 years. Back in 1990, at the time still representing the Soviet Union, she achieved a time of 7.69 seconds in Chelyabinsk. When Kallur stormed across the goal line, the display actually read the numbers: 7 seconds, 6 tenths, and 8 hundredths. World record! Kallur was over the moon, Blondel was happy, the audience went wild and celebrated the then 26-year-old with great enthusiasm. The world record did not quite come as a surprise. For ten races, the Swedish athlete had remained unbeaten indoors and had closely missed Engquist’s best time just the week before. But Kallur was not the only one in top form in this race. Spurred on by the outstanding Swedish runner, all finalists ran new personal bests and thereby ensured one of the fastest indoor races. Today, this indoor world record still stands, and it was set at the INDOOR MEETING – back then still at the Europahalle. In 2018, the US girls dominated the hurdle race at the INDOOR MEETING. At the finish line, Sharika Nelvis (7.80 seconds) and Christina Manning (7.82 seconds) were only one hundredth of a scond apart. It would be a sign of the duo´s dominance right at the start of the IAAF World Indoor Tour, which finally saw them secure the Tour victory in the women´s 60-metres hurdles.

60 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:06,92 - RUS
11.02.1993, Madrid
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:06,92 - RUS
11.02.1993, Madrid
 
MEETING RECORD
Irina Privalova - 00:07,04 - RUS
11.02.1996, Karlsruhe

3000 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Genzebe Dibaba - 08:16,60 - ETH
06.02.2014, Stockholm
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Laura Muir - 08:26,41 - GBR
04.02.2017, Karlsruhe
 
MEETING RECORD
Laura Muir - 08:26,41 - GBR
04.02.2017, Karlsruhe

Triple Jump Records

WELTREKORD
Tatjana Lebedjewa - 15,36 - RUS
06.03.2004, Budapest
 
EUROPAREKORD
Tatjana Lebedjewa - 15,36 - RUS
06.03.2004, Budapest
 
MEETINGREKORD
Yamile Aldama - 14,88 - SDN
28.02.2003, Karlsruhe

Pole Vault Records

WORLD RECORD
Jennifer Suhr - 5,03 - USA
30.01.2016, Brockport
 
EUROPEAN RECORD
Jelena Isinbajewa - 5,03 - RUS
23.02.2012, Stockholm
 
MEETING RECORD
Silke Spiegelburg - 4.76 - GER
13.02.2011, Karlsruhe

Out of tour: 60 M Hurdles Records

WORLD RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

EUROPEAN RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

MEETING RECORD
Susanna Kallur - 00:07,68 - SWE
10.02.2008, Karlsruhe

events men

Full sprint over two laps of the stadium

The 400 metre race is the longest sprint discipline that is held both in- and outdoors. It is also held as both the fifth discipline in the mens decathlon and as a relay competition. When the men run at full speed all the way, they complete the distance in an incredible time of 43 seconds outdoors and 45 seconds indoors. The current indoor world record is 44.57 seconds and was run in 2005 by the American Kerron Clement. The mens 400-metre race last took place at the INDOOR MEETING, Karlsruhe in 2012; when Pavel Maslak of the Czech Republic won gold in one of two races with a time 46.29 seconds.

Baala´s French home game

For almost a decade, Mehdi Baala was something like a permanent guest at the INDOOR MEETING. In addition, the man who lives near Strasbourg regularly trained in the Europahalle, almost making his performances into a home game — be it in the 800-metre, the 1000-metre, or the 1500-metre race, which he won three times. While he merely took second place at his first competition in 2000, he won in the two years that followed. He celebrated his greatest success exactly nine years after his début. For his third Meeting victory in the 1500-metre race in 2009, he raced to the finish line in just 3:34.71 minutes. At the time, it was not only the best performance of the year in Europe but also a new French indoor record. Twice (in 2002 in Munich and in 2006 in Gothenburg) he became Open Air European Champion. In 2003 in Paris at the Home World Championships, he won the silver medal and at the Olympic Games in Beijing. He was later awarded the bronze medal when the original winner Rashid Ramzi had been convicted of doping. Since 2010, the 1,500-metre middle distance has been dominated by Kenyan athletes. Five of the seven races since then have been won by Gideon Gathimba, Bethwel Birgen (twice), Nixon Chepseba, and, in 2017, Silas Kiplagat of Kenya. The current Meeting record holder is also a Kenyan. In 2005, Daniel Kipchirchir Komen crossed the finish line in just 3:33.08 minutes, a time that has yet to be beaten.

Following the traces of the great Larry Myricks

The men’s long-jump competition was part of the INDOOR MEETING from the very start, at its first edition in 1985. US-American Larry Myricks won the competition back then. In the 1970’s, he ranked among the world’s best long jumpers. In total, he won the Meeting in Karlsruhe four times. Furthermore, Myricks holds the current Meeting record with 8.38 meters. Long jump held a regular spot in the INDOOR MEETING’s repertoire since its beginnings. But in the late 1990’s, the program’s focus shifted towards the triple jump. Only in 2010 did long jump regain its place in the program. The last German winner in the long jump was local hero Julian Howard in 2016. In 2015, he had lost the Spaniard Eusebio Caceres in the first year at the exhibition hall. A year later, the athlete from LG Region Karlsruhe jumped 8.03 metres, which earnt him the gold medal.

Is the Meeting record set to be challenged?

 

The audience in Karlsruhe had to wait a wohle 18 years for the high jump to return, and it is finally back again in 2017. The competition was one of the disciplines at the very first Meeting in 1985, and the high jumpers also competed in the two years that followed. However, the men’s high jump only took place three more times after that. And with the victory of Sergei Kluygin of Russia, who became an Olympic champion in Sydney one year after his success at the 1999 Meeting, in which he had jumped 2.29 metres, the short era of the men’s high jump was over after only six events. And yet, there had been some great names jumping the bar at that time, among them Artur Partyka of Poland, two times silver medallist at the Olympic Games (Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996), who won at the 1990 Meeting with a 2.25-metre jump. The Meeting record of 2.31 metres is also held by high jumpers, who were once among the best in the world, such as Jan Zvara of the Czech Republic, who had to share his Meeting record of 2.31 in 1986 with Troy Kemp. The man from the Bahamas, who became world champion in Gothenburg in 1995, also jumped 2.31 metres at the Meeting in 1994. In 2017, the men´s high jump was part of the IAAF World Indoor Tour. Belorussian Pavel Seliverstau jumped 2.30 metres, securing the gold over Mateusz Przybylko of Germany. It will be exciting to see wheter the Meeting record will be broken in 2019.

Turbo-Yuriy and his breathtaking finish

About 15 years have passed since a young Russian athlete downright turned the world of athletics upside down in the 800 meters. The unorthodox way in which Yuriy Borzakovskiy tackled this middle distance was unprecedented. Visitors at the 2001 INDOOR MEETING couldn’t believe their eyes as the then 19-year-old lagged behind his opponents for two rounds at the Europahalle, all hope seemingly lost, but then turned on the turbo that would become his trademark. Borzakovskiy overtook the entire competition from last place, ran his opponents into the ground, and finished with a time that the Meeting had never seen and which would not be achieved again at a later time. The time read 1:44.15 minutes as the young Russian crossed the finish line. This was a Meeting record and basically the international birth of middle-distance superstar who was also able to celebrate victory at the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Last year, the men´s 800-metre was part of the IAAF World Indoor Tour indoor athletics series. At the start of the World Indoor Tour, Marcin Lewandowski won in Karlsruhe with a time of 1:46,90 minutes. However, the was only able to secure sceond place in the overall ranking with his victory in Karlsruhe and a second place in Glasgow.

400 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Kerron Clement - 44:57 - USA
13.03.2005, Fayetteville

EUROPEAN RECORD
Thomas Schönlebe - 45,05 - DDR
05.02.1988, Sindelfingen

MEETING RECORD
Thomas Schönlebe - 46,11 - DDR
11.02.1990, Karlsruhe

1500 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Hicham el Guerrouj - 03:31,18 - MAR
02.02.1997, Stuttgart

EUROPEAN RECORD
Andrés Díaz - 03:33,32 - ESP
24.02.1999, Piräus

MEETING RECORD
Daniel Kipchirchir Komen - 03:33,08 - KEN
13.02.2005, Karlsruhe

Long Jump Records

WORLD RECORD
Carl Lewis - 8,79 - USA
27.01.1984, New York

EUROPEAN RECORD
Sebastian Bayer - 8,71 - GER
08.03.2009, Turin

MEETING RECORD
Larry Myricks - 8,38 - USA
07.02.1988, Karlsruhe

High Jump Records

WORLD RECORD
Javier Sotomayor - 2,43 - CUB
04.03.1989, Budapest

EUROPEAN RECORD
Carlo Thränhardt - 2,42 - GER
26.02.1988, Berlin

MEETING RECORD
Troy Kemp - 2,31 - BAH
01.03.1994, Karlsruhe

Out of tour: 800 M Records

WORLD RECORD
Wilson Kipketer - 01:42,67 - DEN
09.03.1997, Paris

EUROPEAN RECORD
Wilson Kipketer - 01:42,67 - DEN
09.03.1997, Paris

MEETING RECORD
Yuriy Borzakovskiy - 01:44,15 - RUS
27.01.2001, Karlsruhe